Houseplant Statistics (2024)

Indoor plants have been the talk of the town, and houseplant statistics are all you need to get caught up! From people’s small office spaces to kitchen counters, living rooms, and bedrooms, indoor plants have been a constant presence, especially since the pandemic has come and gone.

Be it for decorative purposes or something more meaningful, like facilitating one’s health and well-being, houseplants have definitely made a mark on our lives—especially for Millennials and Gen Z.

So, if you want to brush up on some houseplant statistics and facts, you’ve come to the right place. Check out the complete list below!

47 Houseplant Statistics and Facts

  1. 66%, or more than 200 million Americans, were houseplant owners in 2020
  2. 16% considered themselves “plant parents,” while a whopping 84% said they were “just plant owners”
  3. More than just a hobby: 7 in 10 Millennials labeled themselves “plant parents”
  4. 33.1 million American households had houseplants in 2019
  5. People typically budget $75 annually for their houseplants and $566 in a lifetime
  6. The demand for houseplants increased by 18% during the COVID-19 pandemic
  7. 48.8% started gardening and landscaping due to the pandemic
  8. The COVID-19 pandemic boosted houseplant sales by more than 15%
  9. 96% of independent garden centers expected more sales in 2021 compared to 2020
  10. There was a 2% increase in plant ownership points from 64% in 2018 to 66% in 2019
  11. 37% of houseplant owners were plant killers
  12. On average, Millennials have killed 7 of their houseplants
  13. 67% of Millennial plant parents considered themselves “plant murderers”
  14. One of the top five challenges in caring for a houseplant included “how easy it is to kill a plant”
  15. Plant parents worried about how to keep their houseplants alive
  16. 47% of houseplant owners were disappointed when they accidentally killed their plant, while 27% felt nothing when their plant died
  17. 50% of houseplant owners failed to meet the bare minimum; they forgot to water their plants!
  18. There are over 10,000 houseplant species available commercially
  19. The difference in the market size of the plant and flower growing sector grew from $17.17 billion in 2021 to $18.5 billion in 2022
  20. The global indoor plants market size totaled $16.2 billion in 2022 and is estimated to reach a market size of $30.4 billion by 2032
  21. The majority of houseplant owners buy indoor plants because they want to improve the air quality in their homes
  22. 45% of gardening stores sold their products directly to consumers through retail
  23. Plant purchasers relocated at the beginning of the pandemic, and in 2019, plant buyers were usually in rural or small-town areas
  24. We spend 90% of our time indoors, and houseplants are key to surviving that!
  25. 60% suffer from Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) and need indoor plants to get by
  26. Indoor plants increase a room’s humidity by 10%
  27. Indoor plants can remove up to 87% of airborne toxins in 24 hours
  28. Indoor plants make people 12% more productive
  29. Interacting with indoor plants for at least 15 minutes can reduce stress levels
  30. More indoor plants = healthy employees = less absenteeism
  31. With houseplants, 72% were left feeling happier, and 44% were given optimism and hope
  32. 50.5% of houseplant purchasers were women, while men were at a close second, at 49.5%
  33. Men bought houseplants for home aesthetic purposes, while women bought indoor plants because they wanted something pretty to look at
  34. Gen Z and Millennials bought indoor plants because they wanted to care for a living creature, while older generations got houseplants to improve air quality
  35. 28% of American Millennials and Gen Z became plant owners in 2021
  36. A person’s oldest houseplant is likely to be five years old
  37. 55% fawned over aloe vera
  38. One plant to rule them all: succulents were the top pick for indoor plants
  39. Houseplant spending is typically capped at $110
  40. 72.9% of plant owners would buy plants more than once in their lifetime
  41. For 61% of people under 40, plants are the new pets
  42. The usual—or unusual—plant placements: 70% of houseplants are placed in the living room, while 47% are placed in the kitchen
  43. The “plantsagram” phenomenon: plant-related hashtags can yield up to 10 million posts each
  44. For one-third of American households, buying a plant is an affordable happiness-generating hobby
  45. Potted plants are more popular, with 37% of respondents being more inclined to purchase a plant if it’s in a pot
  46. Edible plants were trending in 2021: 67% of adults were growing or at least planned to grow indoor plants they can consume
  47. 57% of plant owners talk to their plants, and 41% have posted their plants on social media at least once

1. 66%, or more than 200 million Americans, were houseplant owners in 2020

A large majority of Americans love to have some greenery in their homes. Per a report published in 2020 by Civic Science, over 200 million people in the United States, which is equivalent to 66% of the population, owned at least one houseplant.

This shows how much of a popular addition houseplants have become to people’s lives! (1)

2. 16% considered themselves “plant parents,” while a whopping 84% said they were “just plant owners”

Nowadays, it is extremely common for plant owners to consider themselves plant parents. So, it was surprising when Civic Science’s study revealed that only 16% of people considered themselves plant parents.

Contrary to this, a whopping 84% considered themselves as “just a plant owner.” (1) Civic Science’s study focused on a broader demographic of respondents, and this perhaps contributed to the results.

3. More than just a hobby: 7 in 10 Millennials labeled themselves “plant parents”

On the other hand, a more focused study conducted by OnePoll and Article found that in their respondent population of 2,000 Millennials, 7 out of 10 considered themselves plant parents.

To call themselves so means they see houseplants as more than mere decorative pieces. Instead, they view them as something important they are responsible for. (18)

4. 33.1 million American households had houseplants in 2019

According to a houseplant gardening participation survey running from 2010 to 2019, 33.1 million U.S. households participated in indoor houseplant gardening in 2019. (27)

5. People typically budget $75 annually for their houseplants and $566 in a lifetime

According to Craftjack, most people who have houseplants would spend an average of $75 a year on their planting hobby. 

However, total spending for one’s houseplants could go up to $566 throughout a plant owner’s lifetime. (14)

6. The demand for houseplants increased by 18% during the COVID-19 pandemic

According to a survey conducted by Garden Center magazine in March 2021, the popularity of houseplants has had a significant impact on the sales, demand, and prices of indoor growing products.

The survey, which involved more than 250 independent garden center owners and managers in the United States and Canada, revealed that indoor growing sales accounted for a substantial portion of total sales, with 20% or more coming from this category.

Furthermore, the survey showed that indoor growing sales had surged by 18% in 2021 compared to the previous year, indicating a growing trend in the market.

Overall, the survey highlights consumers’ increasing interest and demand for indoor gardening and the potential for growth in the indoor growing industry. (21)

7. 48.8% started gardening and landscaping due to the pandemic

The Consumer Houseplant Purchasing Report 2021, coordinated by the Floral Marketing Fund, revealed that almost half of their respondents have only just started gardening and landscaping as a hobby due to the start of the pandemic. (22)

8. The COVID-19 pandemic boosted houseplant sales by more than 15%

The start of the pandemic and the lockdown boosted indoor houseplant sales by more than 15% in the United States and Canada. Nearly 65% of independent United States and Canada garden centers polled in 2021 noted this change. (2)

Only 7% of respondents said that sales stayed the same, even with the pandemic, and only 2% observed that their sales have decreased because of COVID-19. (16)

Then, in an article published by Garden Center, garden centers’ 2020 sales increased more than 15% for 64% of their respondents, compared to 2019. (21)

9. 96% of independent garden centers expected more sales in 2021 compared to 2020

240 of the 250 independent garden centers Garden Center magazine interviewed expected more indoor plant sales in 2021 compared to 2020. 

For them, it’s an upward trend, coming from the 15% sales growth from 2019 to 2020. (21)

10. There was a 2% increase in plant ownership points from 64% in 2018 to 66% in 2019

In fact, since 2019, plant ownership has increased by two percentage points in the United States. This is clearly shown in the shift in the number of houseplant owners in the United States, from 64% owning a houseplant in 2018 to 66% owning a houseplant in 2019.

YearHouseplant Owners
201864%
201966%

Additionally, the number of consumers without interest in owning a plant decreased by one percentage point—from 27% to 26%. (1)

11. 37% of houseplant owners were plant killers

However, 37% of non-expert gardeners participating in a survey conducted in 2021 explained that they killed one or two indoor plants in just one year.

Conversely, only 11.5% percent of non-expert gardeners answered that they killed six or more indoor plants in one year. (8)

12. On average, Millennials have killed 7 of their houseplants

According to a more focused study conducted by OnePoll and Article, it has been found that, on average, Millennials have unintentionally caused the death of around seven houseplants at the time of the survey. (18)

13. 67% of Millennial plant parents considered themselves “plant murderers”

Of the OnePoll and Article respondents who have admitted to killing at least one of their plants, 67% considered or called themselves “plant murderers.”

This shows how much stress and anxiety Millennials feel about starting their own indoor garden. In fact, 19% of respondents believed that watching and caring for plants is more stressful than a root canal! (18)

14. One of the top five challenges in caring for a houseplant included “how easy it is to kill a plant”

As plant parents, Millennials encounter several difficulties in caring for their indoor plants, leaving them unable to keep them alive. OnePoll and Article revealed that 22% of the 2,000 Millennials surveyed said that they were afraid to pursue caring for houseplants because they’ve accidentally killed at least one. (18)

The Millennial respondents said that the most challenging parts of taking care of houseplants included (18):

50%The proper sunlight needed
46%How much water is needed
43%Whether the plant is an indoor or outdoor one
34%The importance of pruning plants
30%How easy it is to kill a plant

15. Plant parents worried about how to keep their houseplants alive

OnePoll and Article’s study also had their Millennial respondents list down what they worry most about as plant parents.

Here are their top five worries and sources of anxiety (18):

60%Making sure they have enough sunlight
56%Ensuring they have enough water
48%Keeping them alive
37%Stressing out the plans when they move them
21%Finding a plant sitter when away or out of town

16. 47% of houseplant owners were disappointed when they accidentally killed their plant, while 27% felt nothing when their plant died

A study by Civic Science shows that when one’s houseplant dies:

  • 47% are disappointed
  • 19% are left feeling guilty
  • 13% become sad or depressed
  • 27% of the population has a neutral reaction: they feel nothing because “it was just a plant.” (1)

This also coincides with Acumen Research and Consultating’s study, which shows that one of the market deterrents is how hard it is to care for indoor plants. This includes high maintenance requirements and high costs for indoor plant setups, including lighting and irrigation systems. (13)

17. 50% of houseplant owners failed to meet the bare minimum; they forgot to water their plants!

Sometimes, the death of a houseplant is unavoidable. But for the most part, it’s because they weren’t cared for well enough.

Most of Craftjack’s respondents said they only spent about five minutes a week caring for their plants. (14)

This makes caring for houseplants seem like a breeze. However, many still find it hard to keep their indoor plants alive!

In fact, according to Civic Science, 50% of houseplant owners admitted that they forgot to water their plants correctly. (1)

18. There are over 10,000 houseplant species available commercially

People actually started taking care of plants indoors in ancient times—around 5,000 years ago. It’s also believed that Ancient Egyptians were the ones who started this trend when they started bringing in their ferns and palm trees inside to decorate their homes and recreate nature in their homes.

Today, there are over 10,000 houseplants species that are being sold commercially. These are typically sold in nurseries, garden centers, and, more recently, online! (17)

19. The difference in the market size of the plant and flower growing sector grew from $17.17 billion in 2021 to $18.5 billion in 2022

One study from Statista showed that the market size of the plant and flower growing sector in the United States fluctuated from 2012 to 2022.

However, a significant change was noted in 2022, when the market size reached $18.5 billion, compared to the previous year’s total of $17.17 billion. (12)

YearMarket Size
2021$17.17 billion
2022$18.5 billion

20. The global indoor plants market size totaled $16.2 billion in 2022 and is estimated to reach a market size of $30.4 billion by 2032

A study by Acumen Research and Consulting noted this record-breaking shift and noted that the benefits associated with houseplants are most likely the main market drivers for consumers.

Though their study revealed that the Asia-Pacific would be the dominating region for the market’s growth, they also showed that North America would be the fastest-growing region. (13)

21. The majority of houseplant owners buy indoor plants because they want to improve the air quality in their homes

These are the top reasons people are buying houseplants, according to Civic Science:

  • 22% buy houseplants to improve their home’s air quality.
  • 21% buy houseplants either to have something pretty to look at or to enhance the design of their homes.
  • 12% buy houseplants because they want to care for something alive.
  • 9% buy houseplants for cooking purposes (1)

This directly coincides with Acumen’s research, showing that increasing awareness of a houseplant’s benefits is one of the main market drivers for the increase in the indoor plants market size. (13)

22. 45% of gardening stores sold their products directly to consumers through retail

In a survey conducted in 2021, 45% of respondents stated they sold their products directly to consumers through retail.

Independent garden centers ranked second, with 36% of respondents stating they were major customers. (3)

23. Plant purchasers relocated at the beginning of the pandemic, and in 2019, plant buyers were usually in rural or small-town areas

From 2019 to 2021, there was a shift in where plant purchasers lived, which again reflects the impact of the pandemic lockdowns.

In 2019, buyers tended to be in rural or small-town settings, while in 2021, purchasers were more likely to be in metropolitan or suburban areas in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. (4)

24. We spend 90% of our time indoors, and houseplants are key to surviving that!

As cities evolve and become more and more modern, we slowly but surely distance ourselves from nature.

This opens the door for visual pollution, affecting us and leaving us with a “longing for a closer connection with nature.”

As we spend 90% of our time indoors, one of the most effective ways of building a connection with nature is by filling our spaces with houseplants.

Having indoor plants is an ideal way to “create attractive and restful settings” to “enhance our sense of well-being” while indoors—away from nature. (5)

25. 60% suffer from Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) and need indoor plants to get by

According to the LA County Public Health Office, up to 60% of office workers report at least one health problem attributable to their workplace due to the Sick Building Syndrome. (6)

Then, according to a study by Mohammad Arif Kamal published in 2023, plants improve the indoor environment, thus helping to reduce the Sick Building Syndrome people experience.

In a more straightforward sense, according to Kamal, plants contribute to cleaner, healthier air for us to breathe. This helps improve our overall well-being and comfort and allows for a more pleasant overall environment.

Scientifically, per Kamal, plants reduce carbon dioxide levels, lower levels of certain pollutants like benzene and nitrogen dioxide, and reduce airborne dust levels—all contributing to improving overall air quality. (5)

26. Indoor plants increase a room’s humidity by 10%

According to Gitnux, the humidity in a room increases by 10% thanks to houseplants. (19)

Then, in a case study by MDPI conducted in classrooms in Sweden, it’s proven that indoor plants lower CO2 by 10%, too, and allow indoor temperatures to stabilize better. (20).

27. Indoor plants can remove up to 87% of airborne toxins in 24 hours

In a NASA study released in 1989, it was revealed that plants play a significant role in the removal of organic chemicals from indoor air. Toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and more, were tested in their study.

Plants are effective in the removal of indoor air pollution directly through their leaves or indirectly through their roots or soil pathways.

According to the same study, the presence of common plant foliage can significantly reduce the levels of indoor air pollutants by 87% within just 24 hours. (25)

28. Indoor plants make people 12% more productive

In one study, workers have shown that they are 12% more productive when plants are in their working space.

According to Mohammad Arif Kamal, “When a company provides and maintains plants for their employees, a message of goodwill is sent. Workers feel management cares because plants create a tended space, giving people a sense of caring and well-being.” (5)

In another study by Virginia Lohr, she says, “Reaction time in the presence of plants was 12% faster than in the absence of plants, indicating that plants contributed to increased productivity.” (24)

29. Interacting with indoor plants for at least 15 minutes can reduce stress levels

Indoor plants are known to have a calming effect on people. A study conducted by the Journal of Physiological Anthropology looked into the benefits of interacting with houseplants and found that it can reduce stress levels. 

Participants in the study were randomly assigned to two groups. One group transplanted an indoor plant while the other group worked on a computer task. After 15 minutes, researchers measured their stress levels. 

The results indicated that interacting with indoor plants can reduce both psychological and physiological stress responses. This means that indoor plants can help make you feel more relaxed and at ease. (23)

30. More indoor plants = healthy employees = less absenteeism

Having some well-placed plants at work can help moderate noise levels in a closed space, thus reducing stress and keeping employees healthier and happier at work.

According to Mohammad Arif Kamal, There is a “reduction in employee complaints of fatigue by 20%, headaches by 45%, sore throats by 30%, and coughs by 40% in facilities with live plants.” (5)

31. With houseplants, 72% were left feeling happier, and 44% were given optimism and hope

Dr. Hayk Khachatryan, an Associate Professor and Director of the Consumer Behavior and Insights Lab in the Food and Resource Economics Department at the University of Florida, directed a houseplant research conducted from 2019 to 2021, pre- and post-pandemic.

Dr. Hayk states, “One of the most important things we found is that consumers felt plants helped them throughout the pandemic to deal with stressful thoughts and feelings.”

According to his research, 72% of plant buyers reported that houseplants made them happier. Then, 44% reported feeling great optimism about the future even though COVID-19 heavily affected their personal and professional lives. (4)

32. 50.5% of houseplant purchasers were women, while men were at a close second, at 49.5%

According to Zippia’s 2023 post, the gender distribution of plant buyers was almost evenly split, with women making up 50.5% of the buyers and men comprising 49.5%. The median age of plant buyers was 47 years, indicating that the market for plants spanned across different age groups.

Additionally, the study found that the majority of plant owners are White. (15)

33. Men bought houseplants for home aesthetic purposes, while women bought indoor plants because they wanted something pretty to look at

According to Civic Science, men were most inclined to purchase a houseplant because it improves their homes’ design or overall look.

Conversely, women were most inclined to purchase a houseplant because they wanted something pretty to look at. (1)

34. Gen Z and Millennials bought indoor plants because they wanted to care for a living creature, while older generations got houseplants to improve air quality

According to a recent survey, the motivations behind buying houseplants vary across different age groups.

The younger generations, including Gen Z and Millennials, purchased houseplants as a way to care for a living thing and add a touch of nature to their living space. On the other hand, older generations, specifically those aged 55 and above, bought houseplants with the aim of improving the air quality in their homes. (1)

35. 28% of American Millennials and Gen Z became plant owners in 2021

According to the National Gardening Association, 28% of Americans ages 18-44 participated in indoor plant gardening in 2021.

The boom in the popularity of the houseplant industry could also be associated with these generations. (7)

36. A person’s oldest houseplant is likely to be five years old

A study from Craftjack reveals that the average houseplant owner has four plants. The oldest of these four plants is usually five years old. (14)

These findings indicate that houseplants have become increasingly popular among people, and they are willing to invest their time and effort in nurturing them.

37. 55% fawned over aloe vera

In another study conducted in the United States in 2021, 55% of non-expert gardeners believed aloe vera was the easiest indoor plant type to grow in terms of plant care.

38% of non-expert gardeners then deemed succulents the second easiest plant to grow and care for. (9)

38. One plant to rule them all: succulents were the top pick for indoor plants

According to an Indoor Plants Market Overview by Business Research Insights in 2023, four plant types dominated the Indoor Plants Market Share.

The four plant types were succulent plants, herbaceous plants, woody plants, and hydroponic plants.

Among all four plant types, the Indoor Plants Market Overview published by Business Research Insights in 2023 clearly shows that:

  • Succulent plants were the most sought-after
  • Hydroponic plants were the least sought-after (10)

This is backed up by The Consumer Houseplant Purchasing Report 2021, which shows that 64% purchased one or more succulents in 2020. (22)

39. Houseplant spending is typically capped at $110

It’s no surprise that plant enthusiasts are often willing to invest a significant amount of money in their houseplants. However, many of them tend to set a limit on their spending and budget a maximum of around $110 per plant.

This budgeting practice is beneficial to plant parents who are mindful of their expenses but still want to provide the best possible care for their beloved greens! (14)

40. 72.9% of plant owners would buy plants more than once in their lifetime

Plant purchases shot up at the beginning of the pandemic. However, according to Dr. Hayk’s study, people would buy plants again and again and again. This shows the probability of the continuous growth of sales in the indoor plant market, even after the pandemic has passed. 

For many, indoor gardening brings joy, and 72.9% intended to pursue this “happiness-generating hobby” of caring for houseplants in 2021. (4)

41. For 61% of people under 40, plants are the new pets

It has become a common observation that many people consider their pets as their own children. However, there seems to be a new trend emerging among the younger generation. 

According to recent studies, a significant number of young people under the age of 40 now view having plants as the new equivalent of owning pets. In fact, the research indicates that around 61% of this demographic group believed that “plants are the new pets.” (14)

42. The usual—or unusual—plant placements: 70% of houseplants are placed in the living room, while 47% are placed in the kitchen

A big chunk of plant consumers buy houseplants for home decoration purposes. For Dr. Hayk, these consumers view indoor plants as “home décor that just happens to be a live product.”

70% of consumers bought plants for the living room, while 47% assigned houseplants for the kitchen. (4)

43. The “plantsagram” phenomenon: plant-related hashtags can yield up to 10 million posts each

Another thing worth noting is that the Instagram houseplant community is thriving. In fact, you can find a plethora of articles on the internet that list the most Instagram-friendly houseplants. 

Hashtags such as #plantsmakepeoplehappy and #plantsofinstagram have over 10 million posts each! 

These hashtags allow users to endlessly scroll through well-lit and well-curated pictures of various houseplants like monsteras, fiddle-leaf figs, succulents, and more. (11)

44. For one-third of American households, buying a plant is an affordable happiness-generating hobby

Numerous studies have delved into the positive effects of houseplants on happiness and health. However, the affordability of purchasing a plant is also a significant factor in the decision-making process.

According to Julianne Mobilian from Garden Centre Magazine, “affordability” is another appealing aspect.

In 2021, nearly one-third of US households earning $35,000 to $49,000 bought indoor plants, as per the National Gardening Association. (7)

Additionally, 71% of respondents in The Consumer Houseplant Purchasing Report 2021 agreed that having houseplants would make them happier individuals. (22)

45. Potted plants are more popular, with 37% of respondents being more inclined to purchase a plant if it’s in a pot

It is evident that most people love their plants. However, Dr. Hayk pointed out that not all plants are equal.

He asked, “Should you pay attention to pots?” Well, according to his survey, 37% of customers said they pay attention to the pots when buying plants.

Interestingly, customers were more concerned about whether the plant they were buying was already potted or not. The material, texture, sustainability, and brand of the container were relatively less important. (4)

46. Edible plants were trending in 2021: 67% of adults were growing or at least planned to grow indoor plants they can consume

According to the 2021 Garden Trends Report, 67% of adult respondents were either growing or were planning to grow edible plants.

The most popular choices among them are vegetables (52%), herbs (33%), and fruits (31%). 

Due to the pandemic, the popularity of indoor edible plant gardening has increased significantly, leading to an unexpected surge of support for edible food growers and influencers.

Timothy Hammond, who runs Big City Gardener, used to receive one or two messages before the COVID-19 pandemic. However, now he receives dozens of questions every day and has gained 10,000 followers in just 6 weeks! (26)

47. 57% of plant owners talk to their plants, and 41% have posted their plants on social media at least once

As houseplants become increasingly common, people now consider them something beyond a way to pass the time.

Today, plant owners or parents deem them important enough to be talked to and showcased. 

This may be why 41% of plant owners have posted their plants on different social media platforms and why 57% of people talk to their plants! (14)

What Kind of State of Mind Do Houseplants Evoke for You?

Nature has long been regarded as one of the best sources of peace and relaxation. So, it’s not a surprise that houseplants are seen the same way in modern times.

Times are hard, but as long as you have some greenery in your line of sight, there’s no doubt that you’ll find yourself in the zone in no time! Be it at home or work, houseplants are sure to brighten your day.

With that, we hope this collection of houseplant statistics was able to give you informative critical points on the industry and an overall picture of the ever-growing plant market.

References

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  9. (2023, December 1). Easiest indoor plant type to grow and take care of according to non-expert gardeners in the United States in 2021. Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/1300286/easiest-growth-care-indoor-plants-us/#:~:text=For%20over%2055%20percent%20of,roughly%2038%20percent%20of%20respondents.
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  13. (2023, May 1). Indoor Plants Market Size – Global Industry, Share, Analysis, Trends and Forecast 2023 – 2032. Acumen Research and Consulting. https://www.acumenresearchandconsulting.com/indoor-plants-market
  14. (n.d.). STUDY REVEALS HOUSEPLANTS ARE THE NEW PETS. Craftjack. https://craftjack.com/toolbox/houseplant-statistics-2021
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Related: Gardening Statistics